Canning Roasted Red Peppers

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Canning roasted red peppers at home is fairly easy! It’s a great way to preserve your garden peppers and the result is delicious. Canned roasted red peppers can be used in many ways and add amazing flavor to many dishes.


Peppers are a must-have in the summer garden. In fact, you’re most likely going to find a few different pepper varieties in my garden, the classic red bell pepper is one of them!

We eat most of our bell peppers fresh right from the garden as a snack. The peppers that reach the kitchen are usually served as a side to a sandwich or we add them to a salad.

I also love making Mediterranean stuffed peppers, we can eat this dish all day long! And I also make a delicious red pepper paste that you must try, and after all that, if I have any peppers left, I can them as roasted red peppers.

Canning Roasted Red Peppers…

Canning roasted red peppers at home is fairly easy! It's a great way to preserve your garden peppers and the result is delicious. Canned roasted red peppers can be used in many ways and add amazing flavor to many dishes.

Peppers are a low-acid food and for that reason, we have to use a pressure canner to can them. Canning roasted red peppers requires some work, but it’s not hard or complicated.

Equipment You’ll Need…

Before we start, let’s make sure we have all the needed equipment. First, to prep the peppers you’ll need a cutting board and a knife.

For the roasting part, you’ll need a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. An oil sprayer makes it easy to oil the peppers and a spatula makes it easy to scoop the peppers right into a ziplock bag, you’ll see why in a minute.

To can the peppers, make sure that you have jars with new lids (you can reuse rings). My favorite jar size for canning roasted red peppers is a pint, but you can also use half-pints.

You’ll need all of the canning utensils, a clean paper towel to clean the rim of the jar and your pressure canner. I use the Presto canner but this All American canner is also popular.

Selecting peppers for Canning…

A bowl of beautiful red bell peppers.

Any pepper that you can use for cooking can be canned in this method it doesn’t have to be red bell peppers. You can choose hot peppers like jalapenos or a mild chili pepper like the poblano pepper.

Since we are going to roast and peel the peppers in this method of canning peppers, it will be easier to use medium or large peppers. The really small ones are just hard to clean and peel.

Also, try to choose meaty peppers. They are also easier to peel, however, you can see in the picture above, that the peppers I canned were rather small and not too meaty. It just means that prep work took me a little longer.

I started with 6.5 lb of peppers here and after cleaning them I was left with just under 5 lb. This 5 lb made three pints of canned roasted red peppers.

Roasting Red Peppers For Canning…

Removing the stem of the peppers.

Step 1 – some people like to roast their peppers in the oven whole and clean them after they peel them. I prefer to first clean them and then char them. Start by cutting around the stem and removing it.

Cutting peppers before roasting.

Then, halve the pepper and clean it from seeds before you quarter it.

A bowl of bell peppers ready for roasting.

Keep working until all of your peppers are clean.

Spraying peppers with oil before roasting them.

Step 2 – line a baking sheet with parchment paper and lay the peppers in one layer with their skins up. Spray the peppers with oil (doesn’t matter what kind).

Roasted red bell peppers ready for canning.

Step 3 – roast the peppers in a 400 degrees F preheated oven for anywhere between 10 to 20 minutes (depending on the size of the peppers).

Roasted peppers in a plastic bag.

Step 4 – you’ll notice that at some point the skin starts to separate from the flesh of the peppers. Once the peppers reach this stage, take the baking sheet out of the oven and use a spatula to scoop the hot peppers right into a plastic bag. Let the peppers rest for a few minutes in the plastic bag.

Peeling peppers.

Step 5 – after a few minutes open the bag and let the peppers cool for a minute before peeling them. The skin comes off easily at this point.

Peeled peppers in a little pile.

Keep working until all of your peppers are peeled. I ended up giving the skins to the chickens, but if you have a dehydrator, you can dehydrate them and make powder with them that you can then use as seasonings for soups or many other dishes.

How to Can Roasted Red Peppers…

Step 6 – while you work on preparing the peppers, add about 2” of water to the pressure canner (or follow manufacture directions), set it on the stovetop, and turn the heat to high. Bring the water to a simmer (180 degrees F). Also, wash your jars, lids, and rings well with warm water and soap and set them aside.

Adding salt to jars.

Step 7 – once the peppers are ready and the jars are clean, it’s time to pack the jars. Add 1/2 teaspoon of canning or kosher salt to each pint jar (or 1/4 to each half-pint). If you like the taste of vinegar, you can also add 1 1/2 tablespoons of vinegar to each jar but this is optional.

Jars are full of roasted red peppers.

Add the roasted red peppers to the jars. Make sure to leave 1” of headspace…

Packing the jars with roasted peppers.

Then add a little bit of boiling water to each jar, still making sure that you leave 1” headspace. The peppers pack in there pretty well so usually there is not a lot of room for the liquid but do make sure that you add some.

Removing bubbles from the jar of peppers with the bubble remover.

Use the bubble remover to remove air pockets by inserting it between the peppers and the jar. Press the peppers towards the center of the jar and make sure that the liquid fills the spaces between the peppers.

Cleaning the rim of the jar with paper towel.

Use a damp paper towel to clean the rim of the jar before centering the lid and closing the jar with the ring.

Jars of peppers in the pressure canner.

Step 8 – set the jars on the rack in the canner. Close the canner and turn your heat to high. The weight should be off of the vent at this point. The water inside the canner will come to a boil and steam will start escaping from the vent.

Let the canner vent steam for 10 minutes before placing the weight on the valve. Now watch the gauge. When it reaches 11 psi, turn the heat down to medium-high to keep the pressure on 11 psi. Process pint and half-pint jars for 35 minutes.

If you are using a weighted canner you need to process your jars under 10 pounds of pressure for the same amount of time. Remember to adjust processing time according to the table below if you live at an altitude higher than 1000 feet in elevation.

Pressure canning altitude adjustment table.

Once the 35 minutes are up, turn the heat off and let the canner cool to room temperature undisturbed. This will take a couple of hours.

Once the canner has cooled completely, open it but don’t remove the jars right away. Let the jars hang in the warm water for an additional 10 minutes or so before removing them. Set the jars on a kitchen towel on the kitchen counter and leave them undisturbed for at least 12 hours to cool.

Storing Canned Peppers…

A jar of home canned peppers.

Check to make sure that your jars have sealed by pressing the center of each lid. If there is no movement there it means that the jars have sealed and are ready for storage. Remove the rings (cause they rust and stick), wipe your jars, and store in the pantry for up to 18 months.

Using Canned Peppers…

My favorite way to use my canned roasted red peppers is in pasta sauce. This roasted red peppers pasta sauce from the Pioneer Woman has become one of my favorite pasta sauces!

Roasted red peppers are amazing in a grilled cheese sandwich. They go really well with fish, and also with chicken.

Have you ever made roasted red pepper hummus? It’s delicious and you have to try it. And of course, you also must try roasted red pepper soup! These are just a few ideas for you but there are so many more ways to use these canned roasted red peppers.


I hope you enjoyed this tutorial on how to can peppers! Remember that you can do this with many kinds of peppers not only bell peppers. You can check out how Jill from the Prairie Homestead does the same with poblano peppers here.

You Might Also Like…

If you happen to come by a pile of hot peppers, you can can hot peppers in a pickling liquid. That’s another delicious way to preserve peppers. Also, make sure to check out how I preserve peppers in vinegar and salt without any cooking. It’s my favorite way to preserve the little lunchbox peppers that I grow every year.

If it’s specifically jalapenos peppers that you come by, try making and canning cowboy candy which is basically candied jalapenos, or you can try fermenting your jalapenos.

Check out my tutorial on canning carrots, canning tomato sauce, learn how to can pumpkin, and learn how to can meat.

Canning Roasted Red Peppers

Canning Roasted Red Peppers

Yield: 3 to 4 pint jars
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Canning Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes

Canning roasted red peppers at home is simple. You can use this recipe to can any kind of peppers (they don't have to be red!).

Ingredients

  • 5 lb of peppers, cleaned of stems and seeds, and halved or quartered
  • Oil (doesn't matter what kind. It's easier if it's in a spray bottle)
  • Canning or Kosher salt
  • Vinegar (optional)
  • Boiling water

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Lay the peppers, skin up, on the baking sheet in one layer, spray the peppers with the oil and roast in the oven for 10 to 20 minutes until the skin starts to wrinkle and separate from the peppers.
  3. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and use a spatula to add the hot peppers to a Ziplock or produce plastic bag. Close the bag and let the peppers rest for 10 minutes or so.
  4. While the peppers are resting in the bag, fill your pressure canner with 2'' of water and set it on the stovetop. Turn the heat to high and bring the water to a simmer (180 degrees F). Wash your jars, lids, and rings and set them aside.
  5. Open the bag and let the peppers cool for a minute then peel your peppers. The skin should separate easily at this point.
  6. Add 1/2 teaspoon of salt to each pint jar or 1/4 teaspoon to each half-pint jar. If you like the taste of vinegar, you can add up to 1 1/2 teaspoons of vinegar to each jar.
  7. Pack the jars with peppers, making sure to leave 1'' headspace then add boiling water to each jar still making sure to leave 1'' headspace.
  8. Use the bubble remover to remove air bubbles. Then, use a clean paper towel to wipe the rim of each jar before centering the lid and closing the jar with the ring.
  9. Set your filled jars in the pressure canner on the rack. Close the canner and turn the heat to high. Let the canner vent for 10 minutes before placing the weight on the vent.
    If you are using a dial gauge canner, process the jars under 11 psi for 35 minutes. If you are using a weighted gauge canner, process under 10 psi for the same amount of time. Make sure to adjust processing time according to the table below if you live in altitudes above 1000 feet.
  10. Once the time is up, turn the heat off and let your canner cool slowly. When the canner has cooled completely, open the lid and let the jars rest in the hot water for 10 more minutes.
    Use the jar lifter to remove the jars and set them on a kitchen towel on the kitchen counter to cool for 12 hours undisturbed.
  11. Wipe jars, remove rings (cause they rust and stick), label and store in the pantry for up to 18 months.

Notes

Adjust processing time according to the table below if you live over 1000...

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 4 Serving Size: 1 pint jar
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 206Total Fat: 1gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 1gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 1075mgCarbohydrates: 49gFiber: 9gSugar: 24gProtein: 7g

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