How to Make Mulberry Jam

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Learn how to make mulberry jam. This mulberry jam is simple to make, not too sweet and preserves the very special taste of mulberries. It’s a favorite spring and summer jam!


My childhood memories include a whole lot of mulberries. I grew up in Israel, in a small place called a Kibbutz. If you are not familiar with a Kibbutz, it’s basically a self-sustained commune (or… used to be).

Fruit trees are everywhere in Israel. In our Kibbutz, we had a ton of mulberry trees… Small mulberries, long mulberries, white mulberries, purple mulberries…

How to Make Mulberry Jam…

Learn how to make mulberry jam. This mulberry jam is simple to make, not too sweet and preserves the very special taste of mulberries. It's a favorite spring and summer jam!

As kids, growing up in a safe, small village we used to skip classes and go wandering around all the time. You could find us in different places depending on the season. We’d go to the pool, climb the hay bales, take a nap on the piles of fresh cotton, or go hang out with the horses…

But during the month of May, we were in the mulberries. We’d climb the trees, we’d climb on top of roofs, we’d climb on top of each other… Anything to get to the mulberries.

I think that I’ve eaten more mulberries than rice in my life. A few months after I purchased my land here in NC, I met with our local cooperative extension agent to discuss farming possibilities.

The original plan was to plant a few acres with pecan trees, but I also wanted to explore different options. So I asked him about mulberries. He looked at me like I’d lost my mind and told me that mulberries are considered a weed here in the South.

SAY WHAT!? Did you lose your mind?  I didn’t say that out loud…

Have you ever tried mulberry jam? I did say that out loud…

As much as I tried I couldn’t convince the guy that he is missing a very important berry in this berry-full state of North Carolina. Deep inside, I know that there is a huge market for mulberry jam because after you try it you’ll forget all about strawberries, blueberries, or whatever else ends with berries…

Anyway, that year we happened to be visiting Israel right in time for mulberry harvest. My kids went crazy for the berries just like I used to in the past (and the present!). We ate and ate and ate until our tummy hurt.  And then, I made the kids pick some more berries so I could make mulberry jam.

Ingredients For Mulberry Jam…

Long mulberries.

This is a very simple mulberry jam. We are going to use 2 pounds of mulberries, 1 pound of sugar, the juice of half a lemon, and 4-5 lemon seeds because they are rich in pectin and will help the jam thicken naturally.

Since we can’t buy mulberries at the store in an organized container, you might end up with more or less mulberries when you pick them yourself. It’s not a problem to use as many as you have. Just remember to use one part fruit to one half part sugar (that is the ratio that I follow for all of my jams). Then you can add a little more or a little less lemon juice and seeds.

Now, feel free to use any kind of mulberries that you can get your hands on. They should be ripe and juicy and sweet, but other than that the variety doesn’t matter. The mulberries that you’ll see me use in this post are the Pakistani mulberries.

Pakistani mulberry tree.

This here, my friends, is the best thing that has ever come out of Pakistan! My ex-mother-in-law has this tree in her yard. This tree is self-pollinating and produces a ton of berries.

Purple mulberries.

This kind of mulberry was developed in Islamabad. The main difference between this mulberry to others is that the fruit is around three inches long! It is juicy, has a deep red-purple color, does not stain, and is the sweetest thing ever.

The tree is very easy to grow. It’s very tolerant of heat, humidity, and sun. It’s tolerant of drought and poor soil and is disease resistant.

Mulberries turn red/purple.

The fruit ripens mid-spring to mid-summer and is scattered all over the tree. It starts out green and then gradually turns red-purple. It’s very cool to watch this.

If the fruit is not picked it will fall to the ground. I guess this is the only downside I can see to this tree, it can get messy underneath. However, if you have chickens, ducks, or pigs I am sure that they can enjoy the fallen fruit.

Tools For Making Mulberry Jam…

You are going to need a knife to help you get rid of the stems. You’ll need a food processor to process the fruit before cooking it. Then, a shallow pot with a heavy bottom (my favorite for cooking jams) and you’ll need a wooden spoon to stir the jam.

If you’re going to can your jam make sure that you have all the canning equipment that you’ll need. I like using half-pint jars for jams. You’ll need new lids but you can reuse the bands.

You’ll need a ladle to fill the jars with jam, a paper towel to clean the rim of the jar before closing it, all of the canning utensils, and a water bath canner to process the jars in.

Since I made this jam in Israel and not in my own home I didn’t have all of my canning equipment so I didn’t can this jam. We just kept it in the fridge and it was gone very quickly. I will give you instructions on how to can it though, in case that you want to do that. I am guessing that you’ll probably get 5-6 half pints from 2 pounds of fruit.

A Simple Mulberry Jam Recipe…

Removing mulberry stem.

Step 1 – wash your mulberries well. Then, use a knife to remove the stems. It’s hard and not much fun to eat.

Mulberries in the food processor.

Step 2 – add the mulberries to the bowl of a food processor and process them for a couple of minutes…

Sugar and mulberries in a pot.

Step 3 – add the mulberries to the pot and then add the sugar. Turn the heat to medium-high and bring the mixture to a boil, stirring frequently. Boil for five minutes.

Foam on mulberry jam

Step 4 – lower the heat to medium-low. Keep cooking, stirring frequently for about 25 minutes (juice will reduce by about 50%)…

How to make mulberry jam... Almost ready.

After about 25 minutes, you’ll notice that the jam is starting to thicken but it probably hasn’t gelled yet…

Squeezing lemon.

Step 5 – add the juice of half a lemon and about 5 lemon seeds and stir them in. Since we didn’t follow the traditional ratio of one part fruit to one part sugar we can’t use store-bought pectin. But there is really no need, instead, the lemon seeds will help us make the jam gel.

Mulberry jam in a pot.

Now, cook the jam, stirring frequently, until it reaches your desired consistency. It should take an additional 15 minutes or so.

How to Can Mulberry Jam…

You can can mulberry jam the same exact way that you can strawberry jam or mixed berry jam

  1. While the jam is cooking, fill your water bath canner with enough water to cover the jars by at least an inch. Set it on the stovetop and turn the heat to high. Bring the water in the canner to a gentle boil.
  2. Wash the jars, lids, and rings well with hot water and soap. Since we are going to process this jam in the canner for more than ten minutes, there is no need to sanitize the jars.
  3. Use a ladle and canning funnel to fill the jars with the jam leaving 1/2 inch headspace.
  4. Use the bubble remover to remove bubbles by scraping it along the sides of the jar. Then, use a clean, damp paper towel to clean the rim of the jar before centering the lid and closing the jar with the ring finger tight.
  5. Set the jars on the rack of the water bath canner and lower the rack into the boiling water. process the jars for 15 minutes. Remember to adjust processing time according to the table below if you live in altitudes above 1,000 feet in elevation.
  6. Once processing time is over, use the jar lifter to remove the jars from the canner. Set them on a kitchen towel on the counter to cool completely, undisturbed, overnight.
Altitude adjustment table for water bath canning.

Storing Canned Mulberry Jam…

Once the jam has completely cooled, make sure that the jars are sealed before storing them. You can do that by pressing the center of each lid. If there is no movement there it means that the jar is sealed.

Remove the rings (because they rust and stick) and wipe your jars. Store them in a pantry or a kitchen cabinet for up to 18 months.

Serving Mulberry Jam…

A spoon with yogurt and mulberry jam.

You are going to want to make sure that you have sour cream on hand! Just add a couple of tablespoons of this mulberry jam to a small bowl of sour cream and send yourself on a visit to heaven! It’s so good.

It’s also good on homemade yogurt with granola. We use it in a peanut butter and jelly sandwich or spread it on a toast with some butter (this Artisan bread is our favorite!).

And this jam is also thick enough to use in baking. I make delicious thumbprint cookies with it and use it in cakes as well.

Like with everything, there are a few ways to make mulberry jam. I found this recipe that is a bit different if you want to check it out.


I haven’t planted a mulberry tree yet but it’s definitely up high on my priority list. I can’t wait to have my own mulberries! Meanwhile, here in the U.S. we go hunting for mulberries every spring.

We get as many as we can possibly carry. We usually stuff our bellies with as many mulberries as possible and preserve the rest by making mulberry jam. I sure hope that you can put your hands on some mulberries and that you’ll use some to make mulberry jam!

More Jam Recipes…

If you like jams, I have many more for you to try (see all the jam recipes on the blog here)… A couple more berry jams that I didn’t link to above are my chia blueberry jam and my sugar-free strawberry jam if you feel like trying to make jam with honey instead of sugar (it’s delicious!).

If you feel like being a bit more adventurous, try grape jam, mango jam, cantaloupe jam, or persimmon jam. If you like tart jams try my plum and apple jam and this amazing cranberry apple jam recipe.

Lastly, my very favorites (aside from all the other favorites, of course) are peach jam and fig jam.

How to Make Mulberry Jam

How to Make Mulberry Jam

Yield: 3 half pint jars (or so)...
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Processing Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes

A delicious and easy to make mulberry jam recipe with less sugar than traditional jam.

Ingredients

  • 2 lb mulberries, washed and top part of the stem removed
  • 1 lb sugar
  • Juice of half a lemon
  • 4-5 lemon seeds

Instructions

  1. Process the mulberries in a food processor for a couple of minutes.
  2. Add the mulberries to a wide and shallow pot and add the sugar. Bring to a boil, stir frequently. Let the mixture boil for five minutes.
  3. Lower the heat to medium and keep cooking while frequently stirring for about 25 minutes or until the juice reduces by about 50%.
  4. Add the lemon juice and lemon seeds and stir them in. Cook an additional 10 to 15 minutes until the jam reaches your desired consistency.
  5. To can this mulberry jam... While the jam is cooking, fill your water bath canner with enough water to cover the jars by at least an inch. Set it on the stovetop and turn the heat to high. Bring the water in the canner to a gentle boil.
  6. Wash the jars, lids, and rings well with hot water and soap. Since we are going to process this jam in the canner for more than ten minutes, there is no need to sanitize the jars.
  7. Use a ladle and canning funnel to fill the jars with the jam leaving 1/2 inch headspace.
  8. Use the bubble remover to remove bubbles by scraping it along the sides of the jar. Then, use a clean, damp paper towel to clean the rim of the jar before centering the lid and closing the jar with the ring finger tight.
  9. Set the jars on the rack of the water bath canner and lower the rack into the boiling water. Process the jars for 15 minutes. Remember to adjust processing time according to the table below (in the notes) if you live in altitudes above 1,000 feet in elevation.
  10. Once processing time is over, turn off the heat, remove the canner lid and let sit in the hot water for 5 minutes. Use the jar lifter to remove the jars from the canner. Set them on a kitchen towel on the counter to cool completely, undisturbed, overnight.
  11. Check that the jars have sealed. Remove the rings (because they rust and stick), wipe the jars and store them in the pantry or a kitchen cabinet for up to 18 months.

Notes

  1. You can make this jam with any type of mulberry.
  2. Adjust canning processing time according to the table below...


Nutrition Information:
Yield: 6 Serving Size: 1 half pint jar
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 401Total Fat: 1gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 42mgCarbohydrates: 103gFiber: 5gSugar: 94gProtein: 3g

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16 thoughts on “How to Make Mulberry Jam”

  1. Just by reading your post I got my mouth watering- I will get some mulberries from a tree that is planted in a plot near home and try your recipe –
    By the way I live in Delhi, I am Italian and I have a grand child that will love such recipes

    1. Oh, he would love it! And you would too if you like mulberries. It’s funny, but from all the berries there are those, which are considered a weed, are my favorite!

    2. I’m eager to make this recipe! Mulberries are on here in the Iowa! Just curious what the lemon seeds are for?
      Thank you!

      1. Since my jams are low in sugar, I can’t use store-bought pectin, so instead, to help the jam gel, I use lemon seeds. They are rich in natural pectin and help the jam gel. You can remove them when the jam is ready or leave them in the jam, it doesn’t matter.

      1. J & J Nursery, Jurupa Valley, CA (Southern California)
        carries Pakistan Mulberry trees.
        That’s where I purchased mine a couple of years ago.

  2. Thank you so much for this recipe! Been looking for an easy mulberry jam recipe for a while. I have a huge old tree on our property and every year I try new recipes and yours is a standout! I added rose water at end and it is so delicious. Can imagine it would be good with goats cheese on a platter.

    1. Never thought about adding rose water! What a great idea. I’ll try it next time for sure.
      I envy you for that mulberry tree! I might plant one this year. And, yes, it is really good with goat cheese!

  3. I was fascinated to see another type of mulberry, we have a huge tree growing and hordes of fruit each year. I make jam using an electric jam maker, and people just love it, as do my family. Thank you, if I ever get to North Carolina again I shall be on the look out for your spefic fruit/ ours are like little blueberries .I am not good enough on the computer to send you a photo.Thank you for sharing.

    1. I envy you for having a mulberry tree, and kind! It’s such an amazing fruit. I hope to plant one next spring. I made jam with different kinds of mulberries and it always turns out good. I’ve never used an electric jam maker before though!

  4. Dianna L Davis

    Hello, fellow homesteader from WV here. Im always looking for new recipes to try and your Mulberry Jam recipe looked so tasty and has simple natural ingredients. I can’t wait to try it with the mulberries I just picked from our tree. It was a volunteer that came up in edge of the pasture the about 20 years ago. The berries on it are anywhere from 1- 2″ long and dark purple when ripe. We are blessed with wild blackberries, black raspberries , huckleberries and elderberries , muscadine grapes, persimmons and pawpaws here, maybe that’s why West Virginia is called Almost Heaven.

    1. Blessed indeed! I’ll welcome a mulberry volunteer any day! I hope that you’d like the jam. It’s one of my favorites.

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